Author Archives: Michele D.

Jews eating Chinese food on Christmas

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It took me a while but I finally realized that some of the Jews I know typically eat Chinese food on Christmas. I was pulled into the Chinese food on Christmas tradition last year, but only realized it was a “thing” a few months ago when I saw the below sign posted on Facebook:

Jews eat Chinese food

As a Kosher-keeping girl living in Dallas, there’s not a snowball’s chance in you know where that I’m going to find local Kosher Chinese food. And by the time I decided to host the “traditional” Chinese food dinner, it was way too late to order said food from a Kosher Chinese restaurant elsewhere. So …..

Dumplings

I decided to make my own food. The funny thing is that there just aren’t that many recipes out there for Kosher Chinese food so I had to wing-it a bit.

Here’s the menu for our Christmas eve festitives. I’ll try to get the recipes posted over the next few weeks so everyone can have them in time for next year’s Jews eating Chinese food on Christmas celebration:

  • Hot and Sour Soup
  • Egg drop Soup (Made by our cousin)
  • Dumplings (or Pot Stickers) with dipping sauce, pictured above pre-cooked
  • Chinese cole slaw salad (made by my Mother in law)
  • Beef and Brocolli Lo Mein
  • Sweet and Sour Sesame Chicken
  • Tofu Fried Rice (recipe is for chicken but I used firm Tofu chopped into small cubes this time).
  • Rugelach and something with pastry sheets and cream (Made by my cousin and both delicious)

For the Dumplings, I started with a recipe from a cookbook I’ve had for years: The Dumpling Cookbook by Maria Polushkin. I used the Fried Pork Dumplings recipe on page 68 and switched out the pork for ground turkey.

I’ll post the recipe in a few days but if you are into dumplings, wontons and such, you should order this cookbook. The food is not Kosher but there are lots of very good, Jewish-like recipes that can be made Kosher with just a few switches.

What’s your Christmas eating tradition? Do you have Chinese food or something else?

Happy Kosher Chinese Treif cooking!

 

 

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Kosher, cheesy lasagna soup with Italian sausage

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As a treif-loving girl, one of the foods I’ve missed most since taking on Kosher status is Lasagna. Sure, I can make the all-dairy kind of Lasagna, and while it’s good, it’s just not quite the same as the meaty, cheesy treif version.

So I was more than thrilled to come across a recipe (I first saw this recipe via a Facebook post) for Lasagna soup from a Farmgirl’s Dabbles. I read the recipe and accepted the challenge to turn this treif dish into something eatable for us Kosher-keeping folks.

Here’s the ingredient list with my exceptions:

  • 2 tsp. olive oil
  • 1-1/2 lbs. Italian Sausage (Kosher Substitute: Tofurky Italian Sausage)
  • 3 cups chopped onions (I only used about 1/2 of an onion)
  • 4 garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 tsp. dried oregano
  • 1/2 tsp. crushed red pepper flakes
  • 2 T. tomato paste (I assume the T. means tablespoons)
  • 1 29-oz. can fire roasted diced tomatoes
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 6 cups chicken stock (Kosher Substitute: Imagine Vegetarian No-Chicken Broth)
  • 8 oz. mafalda or fusilli pasta (I couldn’t find either so I used the twist pasta I had in my pantry)
  • 1/2 cup finely chopped fresh basil leaves (I used 3 or 4 leaves)
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

For the cheesy yummy part:

  • 8 oz. ricotta
  • 1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese
  • 1/4 tsp. salt
  • Pinch of freshly ground pepper
  • 2 cups shredded mozzarella cheese (Optional)

Heat olive oil in a large pot over medium heat. Add sausage, breaking up into bite sized pieces (I chopped up the Tofurky Italian sausage into small pieces) and brown for about 5 minutes. Add onions and cook until softened, about 6 minutes. Add garlic, oregano, and red pepper flakes. Cook for 1 minute. Add tomato paste and stir well to incorporate. Cook for 3 to 4 minutes, or until the tomato paste turns a rusty brown color.

Add diced tomatoes, bay leaves, and chicken stock (I used a skillet for the sausage mixture and then added it to the soup mixture in a pot). Stir to combine. Bring to a boil and then reduce heat and simmer for 30 minutes.

For the next step, as suggested in the recipe, I cooked the pasta in a separate pot and then added some to individual bowls before ladling the soup over them because I wasn’t sure if my daughter would eat the soup, but I KNOW she’ll always eat pasta and cheese. Right before serving, stir in the basil and season to taste with salt and freshly ground black pepper.

While the pasta is cooking, prepare the cheesy yum. In a small bowl, combine the ricotta, Parmesan, salt and pepper.

To serve, place a dollop of the cheesy yum in each soup bowl, sprinkle some of the mozzarella on top and ladle the hot soup over the cheese.

I used a slightly different method to serve. I first placed the pasta in a serving bowl and added the cheesy mixture (ricotta, Parmesan, and Mozzarella). Next, I ladled the soup over the pasta and sprinkled extra Parmesan on top.

I served with baked mixed vegetables (sweet potatoes, etc.) and a bottle of what my friend likes to call “the Kosher version of two-buck chuck” wine from Trader Joes. I’ve recently learned they have a Kosher version of this wine so I decided to give it a try … sadly, it wasn’t my favorite so I probably won’t buy it again, which is a shame since it cost only $4.

Lasagna wine

Enjoy and happy Kosher Treif cooking!

What to do with leftover “new fruit” after Rosh Hashanah

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Prickly Pear Margarita

I don’t know what happens to your “new fruit” after Rosh Hashanah, but in my household, said fruit lies on the counter for a week or so, begins to rot, and someone finally throws it out. Our new fruit selection is usually something unique that we never eat during the year and won’t eat again after taking the ceremonial taste to fulfill our new year’s ritual.

This year, we ended up with the prickly pear. It’s a fruit that has graced our new year’s table many times in the past, so I expected the 4 leftover prickly pears to eventually go the way of the trash can. But on Friday afternoon, I decided to search for recipes that called for prickly pear and … a new Shabbat happy hour tradition was born … the prickly pear margarita.

I won’t claim that getting the juice out of said prickly pears was easy, but it is possible although a bit time consuming. I used the Cactus Fruit Cocktails recipe by Cecilia Hae-Jin Lee via the epicurious web site. Thank you Cecilia for this delicious treat!

Cactus Fruit Cocktails

  • 4 prickly pears, peeled (Peeling the fruit was surprisingly easy. Slice through the fruit lengthwise and peel back the thick outer peel with your fingers, leaving the juicy, seed-filled fruit.
  • Ice
  • 4 ounces tequila
  • 1 1/2 ounces triple sec
  • 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lime juice
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • Coarse-grained salt for rimming (optional)
  • Lime slices for garnish (optional)
PREPARATION

Place the prickly pears in a blender and pulse until liquefied. Strain the juice into a small bowl (you should have about 1 cup of juice). I used a very fine, mesh strainer. It took a while (and some pressing with a big spoon) to get all of the juice, but the seeds stayed behind in the strainer.

Fill a large cocktail shaker with ice, add the prickly pear juice, tequila, triple sec, lime juice, and sugar and shake vigorously.

Pour into glasses filled with ice, rimmed with salt or sugar, if you like. Garnish with lime slices.

What creative ways have you utilized your “new fruit” after Rosh Hashanah?

Happy Kosher Treif Cooking and Drinking!

Kids’ Chopped at home Challenge (Video)

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Zoe has started watching and loving the kids’ cooking shows, especially the Chopped Teen Tournament. She asked tonight if we could do a chopped challenge at home so I picked 5 ingredients for her and let her create a dish. I gave her:

  • Tortillas
  • Lettuce
  • Cherry Tomatoes
  • Papaya
  • Hummus

She had fun and the video above shows the awesome results.

Happy Kosher, not-so-treif Cooking!

Kosher hamburgers and what seems like a very, dairy dessert for dinner

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Kosher hamburger with fried pastrami

A few years ago, we were visiting LA and stopped at a Kosher deli on Pico street for lunch before heading to the airport. I ordered and devoured a hamburger topped with pastrami that was fried so crisp it reminded me of my old treif friend bacon. It was amazingly delicious, and I haven’t stopped craving it since.

A few weeks ago, I decided to attempt a repeat of said burger and the above photo is the result. OK, so it wasn’t as good as the bacon-like burger in LA but it was pretty darn close, and I didn’t need to fly anywhere to get it.

Afterwards, we treated ourselves to strawberry shortcake topped with it-so-shouldn’t-be-served-after-a-meat-meal whipped cream.

Strawberry Shortcake with pareve whipped cream

Thanks to my new friend, So Delicious Dairy Free CocoWhip, we were able to enjoy a dairy-like dessert favorite but in a Kosher pareve form, and it taste just like the real, fat-filled dairy whipped cream. It’s ready-made and can be frozen and then thawed about an hour before you plan to serve. I found it at Wholefoods in Dallas.

So Delicious Coconut Whip

It felt so decadent to be eating whipped cream topped strawberry shortcake, just like my mom used to make, immediately after eating a similar-too-bacon burger.

Have you turned any of your dairy favorite desserts into pareve treats to enjoy after a meat meal?

Happy Kosher Treif Cooking!

Kosher Broiled Spicy Salmon with Hot Pepper Raspberry Jelly

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Kosher Spicy Broiled SalmonA few years ago, I tried a new recipe from Woman’s Day magazine called Broiled sweet and spicy salmon using red pepper jelly. Finding the red pepper jelly was no easy task. I ended up having to order it from Amazon but the end result was delicious.

I decided last night to pull out this yummy recipe again and whip it up for dinner. Only once I started prepping, I discovered the jelly I had on-hand was Hot Pepper Raspberry Preserves. Not exactly the flavor I was going for, but I have to say, it turned outHot Pepper Raspberry Preserves pretty well.

The mixture of jelly, soy sauce and ginger was very spicy but once it was broiled on the salmon, the tongue-burning flavor was tamed enough to enjoy the salmon without keeping a cool drink close by.

My 8 year old ate several pieces and then came back later to finish off the leftovers.

What flavors have you tried to spice-up Salmon?

Happy Kosher Treif Cooking!